October 20, 2014
Neuroscience: Women Outperform Men Under Stress
BY Geoffrey James @Sales_Source, inc.com
LEADNeuroscience and neurobiology prove that women make better decisions under stress, which means most of the time in the business world.A couple of months ago, I posted two curious financial facts: 1) hedge funds managed by women perform 3…

Neuroscience: Women Outperform Men Under Stress
BY Geoffrey James @Sales_Source, inc.com

LEAD

Neuroscience and neurobiology prove that women make better decisions under stress, which means most of the time in the business world.

A couple of months ago, I posted two curious financial facts: 1) hedge funds managed by women perform 3…

October 15, 2014
Forget Facebook, Abandon Instagram, Move To A Village
Diane Cole, npr.org
In the parts of the world that we cover in our blog, many people live in villages.Villages have their problems, to be sure. There may not be a doctor or clinic nearby. Girls may not be able to go to school. Clean water might be a long walk…

Forget Facebook, Abandon Instagram, Move To A Village
Diane Cole, npr.org

In the parts of the world that we cover in our blog, many people live in villages.

Villages have their problems, to be sure. There may not be a doctor or clinic nearby. Girls may not be able to go to school. Clean water might be a long walk…

October 14, 2014

(Source: geronimoor, via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

October 14, 2014

(Source: sandandglass, via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

October 14, 2014
neurosciencestuff:

Aluminium and its likely contribution to Alzheimer’s disease
A world authority on the link between human exposure to aluminium in everyday life and its likely contribution to Alzheimer’s disease, Professor Christopher Exley of Keele University, UK, says in a new report that it may be inevitable that aluminium plays some role in the disease.
He says the human brain is both a target and a sink for aluminium on entry into the body – “the presence of aluminium in the human brain should be a red flag alerting us all to the potential dangers of the aluminium age. We are all accumulating a known neurotoxin in our brain from our conception to our death. Why do we treat this inevitability with almost total complacency?”
Exley, Professor in Bioinorganic Chemistry, Aluminium and Silicon Research Group in The Birchall Centre, Lennard-Jones Laboratories at Keele University, writes in Frontiers in Neurology about the ‘Aluminium Age’ and its role in the ‘contamination’ of humans by aluminium. He says a burgeoning body burden of aluminium is an inevitable consequence of modern living and this can be thought of as ‘contamination’, as the aluminium in our bodies is of no benefit to us it can only be benign or toxic.
Professor Exley says: “The biological availability of aluminium or the ease with which aluminium reacts with human biochemistry means that aluminium in the body is unlikely to be benign, though it may appear as such due to the inherent robustness of human physiology. The question is raised as to ‘how do you know if you are suffering from chronic aluminium toxicity?’ How do we know that Alzheimer’s disease is not the manifestation of chronic aluminium toxicity in humans?
“At some point in time the accumulation of aluminium in the brain will achieve a toxic threshold and a specific neurone or area of the brain will stop coping with the presence of aluminium and will start reacting to its presence. If the same neurone or brain tissue is also suffering other insults, or another on-going degenerative condition, then the additional response to aluminium will exacerbate these effects. In this way aluminium may cause a particular condition to be more aggressive and perhaps to have an earlier onset - such occurrences have already been shown in Alzheimer’s disease related to environmental and occupational exposure to aluminium.” 
Professor Exley argues that the accumulation of aluminium in the brain inevitably leads to it contributing negatively to brain physiology and therefore exacerbating on-going conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. He suggests that this is a testable hypothesis and offers a non-invasive method of the removal of aluminium from the body and the brain. He says the aluminium hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease will only be tested if we are able to lower the body and hence brain burden of aluminium and determine if such has any impact upon the incidence, onset or aggressiveness of Alzheimer’s disease.
Professor Exley adds: “There are neither cures nor effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. The role of aluminium in Alzheimer’s disease can be prevented by reducing human exposure to aluminium and by removing aluminium from the body by non-invasive means. Why are we choosing to miss out on this opportunity? Surely the time has come to test the aluminium hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease once and for all?”
(Image credit)

neurosciencestuff:

Aluminium and its likely contribution to Alzheimer’s disease

A world authority on the link between human exposure to aluminium in everyday life and its likely contribution to Alzheimer’s disease, Professor Christopher Exley of Keele University, UK, says in a new report that it may be inevitable that aluminium plays some role in the disease.

He says the human brain is both a target and a sink for aluminium on entry into the body – “the presence of aluminium in the human brain should be a red flag alerting us all to the potential dangers of the aluminium age. We are all accumulating a known neurotoxin in our brain from our conception to our death. Why do we treat this inevitability with almost total complacency?”

Exley, Professor in Bioinorganic Chemistry, Aluminium and Silicon Research Group in The Birchall Centre, Lennard-Jones Laboratories at Keele University, writes in Frontiers in Neurology about the ‘Aluminium Age’ and its role in the ‘contamination’ of humans by aluminium. He says a burgeoning body burden of aluminium is an inevitable consequence of modern living and this can be thought of as ‘contamination’, as the aluminium in our bodies is of no benefit to us it can only be benign or toxic.

Professor Exley says: “The biological availability of aluminium or the ease with which aluminium reacts with human biochemistry means that aluminium in the body is unlikely to be benign, though it may appear as such due to the inherent robustness of human physiology. The question is raised as to ‘how do you know if you are suffering from chronic aluminium toxicity?’ How do we know that Alzheimer’s disease is not the manifestation of chronic aluminium toxicity in humans?

“At some point in time the accumulation of aluminium in the brain will achieve a toxic threshold and a specific neurone or area of the brain will stop coping with the presence of aluminium and will start reacting to its presence. If the same neurone or brain tissue is also suffering other insults, or another on-going degenerative condition, then the additional response to aluminium will exacerbate these effects. In this way aluminium may cause a particular condition to be more aggressive and perhaps to have an earlier onset - such occurrences have already been shown in Alzheimer’s disease related to environmental and occupational exposure to aluminium.” 

Professor Exley argues that the accumulation of aluminium in the brain inevitably leads to it contributing negatively to brain physiology and therefore exacerbating on-going conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. He suggests that this is a testable hypothesis and offers a non-invasive method of the removal of aluminium from the body and the brain. He says the aluminium hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease will only be tested if we are able to lower the body and hence brain burden of aluminium and determine if such has any impact upon the incidence, onset or aggressiveness of Alzheimer’s disease.

Professor Exley adds: “There are neither cures nor effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. The role of aluminium in Alzheimer’s disease can be prevented by reducing human exposure to aluminium and by removing aluminium from the body by non-invasive means. Why are we choosing to miss out on this opportunity? Surely the time has come to test the aluminium hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease once and for all?”

(Image credit)

October 10, 2014

micdotcom:

Surprise! America’s elected officials are blindingly white and male

White men make up just 31% of the American population, but hold 65% of public elected offices, according to a jarring new study released by the Reflective Democracy Campaign, a project of the Women Donors Network. Women, despite comprising more than half the population, fill only 29% of the 42,000 local, state and national offices surveyed.

The race ratio is even worse. | Follow micdotcom

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

October 8, 2014
Build More Than Just A Resume: Seven Ways STEM Builds Character

Alicia Chang, huffingtonpost.com

Hardly a week passes without a news story that touts the benefits of studying a STEM field. There is little doubt that majoring in a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics discipline can lead to a cushy gig at a buzz worthy tech company…

October 8, 2014
Data Mining: The Consumer Becoming the Consumed
Henk Campher, huffingtonpost.com
Does it feel like someone is always watching you? Have you noticed the same ads showing up no matter where you go online? And they all try to sell you stuff that has very little to do with your actual interests?Jason Feifer over at FastCo recen…

Data Mining: The Consumer Becoming the Consumed
Henk Campher, huffingtonpost.com

Does it feel like someone is always watching you? Have you noticed the same ads showing up no matter where you go online? And they all try to sell you stuff that has very little to do with your actual interests?

Jason Feifer over at FastCo recen…

October 8, 2014
neurosciencestuff:

Gaming vs. reading: Do they benefit teenagers with cognition or school performance?
Children have an increasing attraction towards electronic media in their play. With video games, phones and the internet in abundance, this article in Educational Psychology examines if such leisure activity is impacting children’s cognition or academic performance or whether it would be more beneficial to read.
After a busy day children do need downtime to rest and relax.  Increasingly kids leisure time is spent gaming, but does it detract from homework or would kids be better off reading a book? Historical research shows in some cases that interactive gaming can have positive effects for cognition by promoting memory, attention and reasoning. Other speed oriented games have been shown to improve perception and motor skills, so should gaming for relaxation be encouraged? Lieury et al investigate whether type of leisure activity produces a ‘transfer effect’ influencing learning processes thus improving student performance at school. With an emphasis on gaming and reading they linked patterns of leisure activity with performance in phonology, reading and comprehension, maths, long term memory and reasoning. Fascinatingly gaming previously thought to improve fluid intelligence showed little or no positive correlations to performance whilst reading did, particularly in memory and comprehension. It seems then despite lack of a causal link that reading may be more likely to enhance academic performance.
Should we assume that time spent gaming and away from homework is harmful to students? A further comparison of reading and gaming to most frequent leisure activities showed no negative patterns but interestingly resting had a favourable effect on performance as well as reading. So frequent leisure activity is not necessarily harmful to progress, or always at the expense of homework but can be enriching. The authors conclude “we think that video games are mainly recreational activities and the cognitive stimulation provided is very different from school learning. On the contrary, the results of this survey fully justify the educational role of parents and teachers in promoting reading.”
(Image: Shutterstock)

neurosciencestuff:

Gaming vs. reading: Do they benefit teenagers with cognition or school performance?

Children have an increasing attraction towards electronic media in their play. With video games, phones and the internet in abundance, this article in Educational Psychology examines if such leisure activity is impacting children’s cognition or academic performance or whether it would be more beneficial to read.

After a busy day children do need downtime to rest and relax.  Increasingly kids leisure time is spent gaming, but does it detract from homework or would kids be better off reading a book? Historical research shows in some cases that interactive gaming can have positive effects for cognition by promoting memory, attention and reasoning. Other speed oriented games have been shown to improve perception and motor skills, so should gaming for relaxation be encouraged? Lieury et al investigate whether type of leisure activity produces a ‘transfer effect’ influencing learning processes thus improving student performance at school. With an emphasis on gaming and reading they linked patterns of leisure activity with performance in phonology, reading and comprehension, maths, long term memory and reasoning. Fascinatingly gaming previously thought to improve fluid intelligence showed little or no positive correlations to performance whilst reading did, particularly in memory and comprehension. It seems then despite lack of a causal link that reading may be more likely to enhance academic performance.

Should we assume that time spent gaming and away from homework is harmful to students? A further comparison of reading and gaming to most frequent leisure activities showed no negative patterns but interestingly resting had a favourable effect on performance as well as reading. So frequent leisure activity is not necessarily harmful to progress, or always at the expense of homework but can be enriching. The authors conclude “we think that video games are mainly recreational activities and the cognitive stimulation provided is very different from school learning. On the contrary, the results of this survey fully justify the educational role of parents and teachers in promoting reading.”

(Image: Shutterstock)

October 5, 2014

(Source: stupidfuckingquestions, via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

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